CarGenerator is a totally new approach to emergency power generation. Traditionally, when the power went out, people had to fire up a portable gas generator (hoping that it was sufficiently maintained to ensure it started, and full of enough gas to last until the end of the outage) or they’d have to tough it out in the cold and dark. Many traditional gas generators actually make more power than CarGenerator; it’s not uncommon to see medium-sized portable generator units putting out 3000-5000W or more, but this power comes at a price. Gas generators are cumbersome to store and carry, smelly, need maintenance, and when they’re on, create significantly more pollution and noise than an idling car. If you don’t believe that, check out this scientific test that Edmunds did comparing an F250 diesel to a leaf blower. The results were not pretty…
 
On the other hand, CarGenerator is easy to store and carry, requires exactly NO maintenance, and if your car starts, you’ve got power. Plus, the inverter in CarGenerator is a much higher-quality pure sine wave inverter suitable for running sensitive electronics (like a furnace’s rheostat, thermostat, and computer). That said, 1000W might not seem like enough. Or is it…

We asked people to turn off their unnecessary high-draw luxury items (the hair dryer, the hot tub, etc) and see how much power their furnace and fridge used in an hour. The result; about 1000W. For most homes running EnergyStar-certified refrigerators, equipped with high-efficiency gas furnaces, 1000W is actually enough. No, you can’t run your second fridge, or your convection oven, but you can keep your furnace and sump pump going, your fridge on in the summer.

CarGenerator was specifically designed to balance the needs of a household’s basic power requirements with the available power output from the average family sedan’s alternator. Instead of running the headlights, heated seats and windshield defroster, with CarGenerator, the power from your car’s alternator can be used to power your house. Not all the time, of course, but there when you need it.

1000W might actually be enough.